Determining if a City is Helicopter Friendly
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TATKISSION715
Member Since : 2013
Posts(9)
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Determining if a City is Helicopter Friendly

07-20-2014 01:59:40

I'm trying to determine if cities where our business are located are friendly to helicopter operations. Our business are located inside city limits and parking on site would offer a time advantage. Does anyone know a good way to determine this? Or how to obtain permission from a city if there are restrictions on helicopter ops?

Replies

Grant
Member Since : 2007
Posts(687)
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07-20-2014 08:12:04
Trey,
I would approach it from a business need and not a convenience. Offer to take the Mayor for a ride to show them how it would work. Be sure to fly over their house and give them a bird's eye tour of their town.  Be an advocate for business development in their town and show them how aviation in general, not just helicopters are helping already to improve the lives of the citizen of their town.

Be prepared for objections and be ready for a lively debate.  Remember there is always someone who will complain regardless of the merit.  Those people need to be discredited in a measurable sort of way.

For example, for years a certain individual would call and complain about the airport noise everyday to the mayor's office of a small town I am familiar with.  The monthly meetings would come and go with the complaints being read into the record.  One month, a city council member decided to check into the complaint after remembering the airport was closed for more than a week the previous month for repairs.  Sure enough, the complaints came in each day that the airport was closed.  Because the complainant was sure that he was hearing aircraft noises on those days, it was concluded that he must be hearing airplanes not associated with operations at that airport since the airport was closed and no operations were being conducted for that period of time.  The same city council member retroactively struck all complaints about the airport noise from all previous  records because it was determine they were not valid complaints.  The point is be prepared for people who are complainers.  Document when and where you were operating at what altitudes etc AFTER you are approved.  They will complain but they will not be prepared to defend their complaint when faced with these types of records.
13snoopy
Member Since : 2007
Posts(339)
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07-21-2014 08:00:46
I'm trying to determine if cities where our business are located are friendly to helicopter operations. Our business are located inside city limits and parking on site would offer a time advantage. Does anyone know a good way to determine this? Or how to obtain permission from a city if there are restrictions on helicopter ops?

Smaller towns find helicopter usage a novelty. More major locales will find it a liability. The general public will like it with the exception of the complainers who are against everything and if course the envious/jealous crowd who I've found to be the biggest problem causers.
Check with the city zoning before you spend any further time.
n412ra
Member Since : 2009
Posts(9)
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07-24-2014 02:12:59
Trey,
I would approach it from a business need and not a convenience. Offer to take the Mayor for a ride to show them how it would work. Be sure to fly over their house and give them a bird's eye tour of their town.  Be an advocate for business development in their town and show them how aviation in general, not just helicopters are helping already to improve the lives of the citizen of their town.

Be prepared for objections and be ready for a lively debate.  Remember there is always someone who will complain regardless of the merit.  Those people need to be discredited in a measurable sort of way.

For example, for years a certain individual would call and complain about the airport noise everyday to the mayor's office of a small town I am familiar with.  The monthly meetings would come and go with the complaints being read into the record.  One month, a city council member decided to check into the complaint after remembering the airport was closed for more than a week the previous month for repairs.  Sure enough, the complaints came in each day that the airport was closed.  Because the complainant was sure that he was hearing aircraft noises on those days, it was concluded that he must be hearing airplanes not associated with operations at that airport since the airport was closed and no operations were being conducted for that period of time.  The same city council member retroactively struck all complaints about the airport noise from all previous  records because it was determine they were not valid complaints.  The point is be prepared for people who are complainers.  Document when and where you were operating at what altitudes etc AFTER you are approved.  They will complain but they will not be prepared to defend their complaint when faced with these types of records.
Grant says to take the Mayor for a ride.  I am the mayor and the airport manager.  Trey is welcome to move his company to my town but the population is 700 and we probably don't have the infrastructure to support his business.  Anyway he could land wherever he wants.  I land in the public school yard every December to deliver Santa.  I  have given either helicopter or airplane rides to at least half of the kids and many of the adults in the area.  Our little Kansas town is aviation friendly.

:( :( On the other side of the coin I had a house in the foothills west of Denver where I built a helipad (on three acres) and used it a month before I got notice from Jefferson County to cease and desist.
TATKISSION715
Member Since : 2013
Posts(9)
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07-25-2014 05:57:54
Thank you everyone for the advice. I will keep you posted on my findings.