No One
Member Since : 2018
Posts(232)
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Helicopter Crash

06-28-2012 01:43:34

Hi  I have a question for all you professional pilots out there.  I purchased an R44 IFR trainer.  I had an electrical malfunction and crashed my helicopter.  I did have a copilot with me that was teaching me to get my IFR certificate.  I currently hold my commercial pilots license.  I have 300 hr 240 are in the R44.  Is it possible to still get a job as a helicopter pilot even though I was in a helicopter crash?

Replies

Rotornut
Member Since : 2015
Posts(23)
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06-28-2012 04:43:44
My opinion is you will not be affected  in a negative  way.  Now it may depending on the cause  of the accident. If you could have done something before  or at the time of the accident  to prevent it then you would have to demonstrate to an employer that you learned  a great deal and turn it into a positive. So what caused the accident? What caused you to lose electrical power. Maybe the rest of us can learn from your misfortune. If you are OK with sharing the details.
No One
Member Since : 2018
Posts(232)
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06-28-2012 06:49:23
The biggest problem with the helicopter crash is I had a severe head injury and I can't remember very many of the details.  I do remember that my instrument panel shut off during a night flight, and I reached down and turned on my emergency locater. I did get emails from people in the area saying that there were severe micro-bursts blowing through the area at the time of the crash. It blew sheds over, sent trampolines flying, etc. My copilot (who was also my instructor) says he cannot remember anything as well, but that's because he sued my insurance company.
IBTM
Member Since : 2007
Posts(206)
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06-29-2012 01:51:42
Scotty
IMHO, you were a student and had an instructor who was in essence the pilot responsible.  That should mitigate the downside of the crash.  As you also know due to a head injury, you need to ground yourself and will need to be cleared per the FAA process.  May take a year-- friend of mine who flys a G550 had it happen to him. 
A future employer will look at it and probably just call it a training accident---their chief pilot will fly with you and he will make the call.    Good luck!